Does anyone have any info on a John Wallace born 1780 in Kilnarnock, Scotland and married to Ann Speirs? Is he related to the William Wallace?

3 Responses to “genealogy help – can i be related to William Wallace?”

  • Shenaynay:

    According to this wiki article, William Wallace had no known children.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Wallace

    In any case it would be pretty hard work finding the connection (if any) between someone born 1272 and 1780.

  • Maxi:

    To find out you are gong to have to research 4 centuries of records and if you are having problems with 1780, it is highly unlikely you are going to find it any easier going back the 4 centuries that you would need to……….concentrate on getting your family history correct, looking at cited records, then whoever you do find you will know they are YOUR ancestors and not just a collection of unrelated names……and you never know you may find he is, although it is not very easy to find records you could trust prior to 1600, so don’t hold out much hope, you may be lucky, it really depends on the parish your family lived in and if they where rich or rogues as that always helps in finding records.
    http://www.curiousfox.com/history_S/ayrshire_6.html people looking in Ayrshire
    http://familytimeline.webs.com/apps/links/ some Scottish links

  • ♥ђєl๓คг๏ภ♥ ♥ợ♥๏♥๒♥:

    As another poster advised you he had no know children.

    His wife Marion Braidfute was Murdered by the English Sheriff of Lanark and William Wallace, with a small group of close allies, got revenge by breaking into Lanark Castle and Murdering the Sheriff and his son. They then burned down the wooden castle.

    Marion and William had no children. I do not know if Wallace had fathered any illegitimate children, but the name Wallace apparently indicates that the persons ancestors originally came from Wales.

    http://www.lanarkmuseum.org/wallace.htm

    http://surnames.behindthename.com/php/search.php?terms=wallace&type=n&operator=or
    Wallace
    Usage: English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh

    Means “foreigner or stranger” from the Norman French le waleis. It was often used to denote native Welsh and Bretons. Borne by Sir William Wallace of Scotland.

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