The year 1509 saw the accession to the throne of Henry VIII, a man who would change the face of Britain and the religious and political map of Europe forever…

24 Responses to “Henry VIII’s Lost Palaces (part1/8)”

  • Reg Szikora:

    Thanx for you note back to me… There is actually more. Henry never did get to rest in his casket that he had made for him self. You can see it to-day however. It has Lord Nelson in it. The Chapel that Henry had designed for him self and his casket also lays empty with out him. His son was a strong Protestant, and seen it evil how his father was to be buried, or at least the Symores did for Edward VI. So Henry never did get the stage he so desired in death.

  • William H. Burke, Jr.:

    Thanks very much for the information. Then Henry got what he so
    richly deserved.

  • Reg Szikora:

    Actually it already happened to Henry. It was either Mary or Elizabeth that had his remains desicrated. What is at St. George’s Windsor is questionable at best. No one is sure which Queen had it done, but I think they both had good cause (understatement). What is left of him is buried beside Queen Jane the Consort and Charles I in the floor. Henry the Beheader and Charles the Beheaded are side by side as it where.

  • William H. Burke, Jr.:

    This has nothing to do with religion, only my hatred for Henry VIII
    and the way he treated women, beheading so many of them.
    I admire Dr. Samuel Johnson, one of the greatest Englishman and
    he was an ardent Anglican. I also admire Queen Elizabeth I, who I think was the greatest English monarch.

  • Taff Simon:

    I take it you are a Catholic burkewhb. Would you also like to dig up Luther?

  • William H. Burke, Jr.:

    Actually, I wish to modify my previous comment. Henry VIII’s remains should first be properly crapped on by very large pigs, and then flushed down toilets so as not to unnecessarily befoul the Thames.

  • William H. Burke, Jr.:

    Huh? I have no idea what you’re talking about. Henry VIII was a foul
    scum bag, whether the view is subjective or objective, if that’s what
    you mean.

  • Taff Simon:

    Get a dictionary and look up the word “objective”.

  • William H. Burke, Jr.:

    Thank you very much. I knew it began with an S and ended with a
    bury. I wasn’t too far off.

  • kattaylordesign:

    Margaret Pole, Countess of Salisbury. Not Lady Shrewsbury.

  • William H. Burke, Jr.:

    King Henry VIII was one of the foulest human beings who ever lived. The fat slob married a teenage girl, Katherine Howard, and beheaded her when he found out she’d had an affair with her cousin. He gave an old lady, Margaret of Shrewsbury, an hour’s notice that she was to be beheaded. She refused to put her head on the block and
    tried to run away, and it took 11 whacks by the amateur executioner to kill her. I think
    Henry Viii should be dug up and his remains thrown into the Thames.

  • SuperGreatSphinx:

    Palaces in East Asia, such as the imperial palaces of Korea, Thailand, Vietnam, Japan and China’s Forbidden City, consist of many low pavilions surrounded by vast, walled gardens, in contrast to the single building palaces of Medieval Western Europe.

  • SuperGreatSphinx:

    The earliest known palaces were the royal residences of the Egyptian Pharaohs at Thebes, featuring an outer wall enclosing labyrinthine buildings and courtyards. Other ancient palaces include the Assyrian palaces at Nimrud and Nineveh, the Minoan palace at Knossos, and the Persian palaces at Persepolis and Susa.

  • SuperGreatSphinx:

    In modern times, the term has been applied by archaeologists and historians to large structures that housed combined ruler, court and bureaucracy in “palace culturtes”. In informal usage, a “palace” can be extended to a grand residence of any kind.

  • SuperGreatSphinx:

    In the early Middle Ages, the Palas remained the seat of government in some German cities. In the Holy Roman Empire the powerful independent Electors came to be housed in palaces (Paläste). This has been used as evidence that power was widely distributed in the Empire, as in more centralized monarchies, only the monarch’s residence would be a palace.

  • SuperGreatSphinx:

    At the same time Charlemagne was consciously reviving the Roman expression in his “palace” at Aachen, of which only his chapel remains. In the 9th century the “palace” indicated the housing of the government too, and the constantly-travelling Charlemagne built fourteen.

  • SuperGreatSphinx:

    “Palace” meaning “government” can be recognized in a remark of Paul the Deacon, writing ca 790 and describing events of the 660s: “When Grimuald set out for Beneventum, he entrusted his palace to Lupus” (Historia Langobardorum, V.xvii).

  • SuperGreatSphinx:

    Emperor Caesar Augustus lived there in a purposely modest house only set apart from his neighbors by the two laurel trees planted to flank the front door as a sign of triumph granted by the Senate. His descendants, especially Nero, with his “Golden House” enlarged the house and grounds over and over until it took up the hill top. The word Palātium came to mean the residence of the emperor rather than the neighbourhood on top of the hill.

  • SuperGreatSphinx:

    The word “palace” comes from Old French palais (imperial residence), from Latin Palātium, the name of one of the seven hills of Rome. The original “palaces” on the Palatine Hill were the seat of the imperial power while the “capitol” on the Capitoline Hill was the religious nucleus of Rome. Long after the city grew to the seven hills the Palatine remained a desirable residential area.

  • SuperGreatSphinx:

    Many historic palaces are now put to other uses such as parliaments, museums, hotels or office buildings. The word is also sometimes used to describe a lavishly ornate building used for public entertainment or exhibitions.

  • SuperGreatSphinx:

    A palace is a grand residence, especially a royal residence or the home of a head of state or some other high-ranking dignitary, such as a bishop or archbishop. The word itself is derived from the Latin name Palātium, for Palatine Hill, one of the seven hills in Rome. In many parts of Europe, the term is also applied to ambitious private mansions of the aristocracy.

  • 2011stockholm:

    Sad that only one palace still stands.

  • sarkizmutafyan:

    1509!!!  O_O >-O o_O

  • adesigirl:

    EXCELLENT

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