My surname is Riggs, and I’ve heard it traces back to Dunbar and someone else said Boyd. Can anyone please help me?

One Response to “I’ve been trying to find out my Scottish Clan name and tartan pattern, and I’ve found multiple answers.?”

  • jan51601:

    http://www.scotgenealogy.com/search.php?mylastname=RIGG&lnqualify=equals&mybool=AND
    I don’t know if your surname could have started out as this, but this is as close as I could find–so far: DONALD RIGG (maternal grandmother’s name–Bertha Elsie Cruzille)
    Clan MacKenzie

    http://www.electricscotland.com/webclans/atoc/boyd.html
    Names associated with CLAN BOYD: BOID, BOD, BOED, BOYDE, BOYT, BOHT, BOYD, BHOID,& BODHA

    http://www.electricscotland.com/webclans/dtog/dunbar.html
    Dunbar
    Motto: “Honour is the prize of honesty”.
    Badge: A white horses head.
    Septs: Clugston, Corbett, Dunbar, Dundas, Edgar, Grey, Heryng, Home, Knox, Nisbett, Peddie,
    Strickland, Washington, Wedderburn
    Names associated with the clan: DUNBARRE ;DUNBAR; DUMBARE; DUMBAR; DOUNBARE; &
    ABERLADY

    http://www.ancestry.co.uk/facts/Riggs-family-history-uk.ashx
    Riggs Name Meaning and History
    Northern English: topographic name for someone who lived on or by a ridge, Old Norse hryggr. Compare Ridge (which says ” English: topographic name for someone who lived on or by a ridge, Middle English RIGGE, or a habitational name from any of the places named with this word, as for example Ridge in Hertfordshire. The surname is also fairly common in IRELAND, in County Galway, having been taken to Connacht in the early 17th century. The name is sometimes Gaelicized as Mac Iomaire; iomaire is modern Irish for ‘ridge’.”

    http://www.surnamedb.com/surname.aspx?name=Riggs
    Recorded as Rigg, Rigge, the diminutives Riggey and Righy, and the patronymics Riggs and Rigges, this is a very old ENGLISH surname. It is residential for someone who lived at a place called Ridge, such as the village of Ridge in Hampshire, or who lived on the ridge of a hill. The derivation is from the Olde English pre-7th century word “hrycg” or the Norse Viking “hyrggr”, both of which developed into the Middle English word “rigge”. Locational place names and topographical features provided useful and obvious distinguishing surnames in the Middle Ages, and these surnames ranged from such as Tree, which was owing to residence close by a conspicuous parish or even county boundary marked by a tree, to Hill, or Bridge as examples. These include the marriage between Thomas Ridge and Jane Waters at St James Clerkenwell in the city of London on February 28th 1620, Joseph Righy at St Mary-le Bone on December 10th 1806, and James Riggey, who was christened at St Alphage, Greenwich, on February 10th 1865. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Geoffrey de la Rigge, which was dated 1166, in the Hampshire Pipe Rolls, during the reign of King Henry 11, known as the Builder of Churches, 1154 – 1189.

    http://www.house-of-tartan.scotland.net/scripts/tartan/tfinder.exe
    Said after a search: Sorry. Nothing found for “Riggs”

    http://www.house-of-tartan.scotland.net/scottish/searchclan.asp
    (I used a * for the last 2 letters of your name): Your search for ‘Rig**’ has returned the following
    Clans and Districts
    Search found nothing so this list used the first letter RAEBURN (from there, alphabetically, it went from–starting in the RI area, that is–RIDDELL; RIDDOCH; RITCH ; & ROBBINS.)

    http://www.scotweb.co.uk/tartan?filter_searchterm=Riggs
    No direct matches for “Riggs”

    (So, I think your surname IS English, instead of either Scottish or Irish descent. I cannot find any tartan or clan of either country including that name–even as RIDGE.)

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